Btt Remote For Mac

Posted on
  1. Btt Remote For Macbook Pro
  2. Btt Remote For Mac
Remote access to Mac, anywhere

BTT Remote (BTT stands for BetterTouchTool) is a great remote control for your Mac. In addition, BetterTouchTool 3.365 Crack For Mac is a sidekick iOS app (BTT Remote) that can also be used to manage the Mac from the perfect model. So, This program is not free but you can visit old crack if you need the program to access without charging a lonely penny. BetterTouchTool 2020 Keygen for Mac includes fresh signals in the Magic. Connect Remotely to Mac via Setting Up Remote Login. To setup remote login in order to connect remotely to Mac, what you need to do is to Open Sharing preferences by going to the Apple menu (System Preferences Sharing). Next, what you should do is to select the Remote Login. By doing this, it enables the secure FTP service (sftp).

Get Screens and work across multiple remote Macs.

While many countries are on a lockdown due to COVID-19, remote work is becoming a lifestyle. Remotely accessing a Mac is designed to be easy. Apple has spent a lot of time ensuring anyone can log in to their Macs — both desktop and laptop — from any other Mac device, anywhere. And, besides, there are a variety of third-party apps ready to help with that too.

Still, remotely managing their Mac sounds overly complicated to a lot of people. From how you connect to sharing files or screens to using your Apple device as a remote mouse, we want to demystify the process in the easy-to-follow guide below.

Best Remote Access Apps for Mac

There are times when you want to access your Mac remotely, and there are many different solutions to remote access your Mac. Best utilities in one pack, give it a go!

How to access your Mac from another location

There're two ways: you can allow remote login to your Mac from another computer, or allow others to access your computer using Remote Desktop (it's available from the App Store).

Allow remote login to your Mac from another computer

For devices using the same macOS, you can allow remote Mac login using a Secure Shell (SSH). This enables Mac remote desktop access using a Secure File Transfer Protocol (SFTP).

To set up Remote Login:

  • Go to System Preferences > Sharing
  • Select Remote Login.
  • Choose which users you want to have remote access or the ability to control your Mac.

You can either select All Users, which means any other device on your network, or any Mac you own, can access and connect, or click the plus sign to pick the exact users.

When you want to remotely log in to your Mac from another device, you need to know your username (the name that appears when you login) and your computer's IP address. Write them down and keep them safe, as allowing access to your Mac does make it potentially less secure, especially over cellular or public Wi-Fi networks.

Accessing, controlling, or viewing information on your Mac can be done with a built-in Terminal or any other SSH app using your username and IP address.

Allow others to access your computer using Apple Remote Desktop

With macOS remote Mac access and control is even easier. To set up it:

  • Go to Menu > System Preferences > Sharing
  • Select Remote Management - it should appear as a checkbox.
  • Now you can select who has remote desktop access. Either select, All Users, which means any other device on your network, or Mac you own, can access and connect, or click the Add button(+), which gives you the ability to select who can have remote access and/or control.

If you are using a VPN or VNC viewer and want to access your Mac remotely, you will need to setup a password first. It is also possible to use iOS devices, such as an iPhone and iPad, through Apple Remote Desktop, available from the App Store.

How to stay on the same page with Screens

Collaboration has become of utmost importance to today's workplaces. And with more and more people working remotely, being on the same screen (ahem, page) is a must.

Screens allows you to work remotely with any computer regardless of your location. Whether you are on a business trip or traveling, stay confident knowing you can access any file on your home computer at any time.

This robust screen sharing tool for Mac supports:

  • Multiple displays
  • Drag-and-drop file sharing
  • Hiding your remote screen while accessing it
  • Accessing other computers (e.g. colleague's) as a guest
  • Alternative shortcuts (useful when connecting Mac to PC)
  • Custom actions in case of disconnection

To start using Screens, get the app from Setapp and configure the following:

  1. Remote login and remote management (as per the guide above)
  2. Install Screens Connect helper app and create a Screens ID on every machine you'd like to connect to in the future
  3. Use your Screens ID in the Screens app and it will automatically determine which of your computers are available for connection

Remote desktop client for Mac

Control any computer remotely – a perfect way to access your Mac from anywhere without limitations.

Share files between devices

Today we have plenty of ways to send and share files. But ask someone to send something, and you are likely to get it through email. Due to the ubiquitousness of email, it's still the default method for file sharing, despite its obvious flaws and constraints.

Fortunately, there are much better ways:

Native macOS File Sharing

Few people know that their Mac has native file sharing functionality built in. To use this feature, activate it in the Sharing pane of System Preferences by checking File Sharing. If you only want to share specific folders, add them to the Shared Folders list. If you only want specific users to access the folder, add them to its Users list. Otherwise, everyone will be able to access it.

AirDrop

Although not the most reliable solution, AirDrop works fine for occasional sharing a file between Apple devices. In the Finder, choose Go and then AirDrop on both the sending and receiving Mac. As soon as you see the receiver's user icon, drag the desired file onto it to send.

Read more about how to use AirDrop

Dropshare

Btt Remote For Macbook Pro

If you don't want to send files Mac-to-Mac directly but rather through a cloud storage, there is no easier way than Dropshare. The app works with numerous cloud providers, from Dropbox to Google Drive, and saves your files for sharing by simply dragging them onto its menu bar icon.

File Transfer Protocol (FTP)

The most technical but also the most robust way to share files from your mac is to use FTP, which you could do either through Terminal or an FTP Client, the latter being much more user friendly.

There are a few popular FTP clients one could choose from. The robust file managing app ForkLift covers most of the FTP functionality but takes it to the next level and could be a viable replacement for the Finder altogether with its quick search, instant previews, and file comparison.

DCommander is another full-featured file transfer app for Mac that combines speed and reliability, able to handle thousands of files, schedule backups, and even automate transfers.

At last, when it comes to sharing the same files on different devices, an app like ChronoSync Express becomes invaluable.

ChronoSync Express is powerful tool for sharing and transferring files from Mac to Mac, or any another Apple device. With a feature called Synchronizer Document, you can select which files need to be automatically synchronized and shared between devices, just like that:

  1. Create a new synchronizer document for each folder synchronization you'd like to perform
  2. Name the synchronization
  3. Change the Operation to Synchronize Bidirectional
  4. Select folders to sync on the left and right
  5. Test with a Trial Sync

Do you need to use a VPN (Virtual Private Network)?

Whether you are working on your Mac directly, logging into your Mac remotely, or sharing access with someone else, security should be on top of your mind.

As a rule of thumb, you should always use a VPN when connected to a public Wi-Fi network, as someone could log in and see the information you send just as easily as you do.

And with remote access — even in the View Only mode — someone can see every file and document on your Mac, except those that are password protected. Unfortunately, if you leave passwords in a visible document, you expose yourself to immense risks.

A secure VPN client for Mac like Shimo is well worth using to stop unwanted eyes from lurking around, especially if you are sharing sensitive files, financial records or customer data.

However, for extra peace of mind and security, consider firing up your VPN automatically on all networks you are not 100% sure about to keep your emails, bank accounts and personal documents safe.

To share your Mac with someone else, download a remote Virtual Network Computing (VNC) app like Jump Desktop. With full remote access and Mac remote control, the other person — or yourself connecting to another Mac — can have the same level of control as the person using that device. Except for Admin level access, since it's password protected.

Starting with Jump Desktop is easy: either yourself (gaining access) or the person you are giving a remote view or control access to your Mac, needs to add details of the device and the password.

Secure your access with VPN

Get a VPN client for Mac to avoid privacy infringement while connecting remotely. It's secure and free to try.

Once permission is granted at the other end, remote Mac screen sharing or control (whereby you can use the iOS device as a remote mouse) becomes possible.

How to use your iOS device as a remote mouse

If your remote work starts on a patio hammock somewhere in east Asia, you should note that Apple iOS devices, such as an iPhone or iPad, can be used to control a Mac remotely, much like a mouse can control a desktop or laptop. Apps that make this possible work on VNC.

Remote Mouse is the easiest, most effective way to turn your iOS device into a wireless remote control for your Mac.

Although remote access through a local network would be most effective, since the closer you are to the device the quicker the connection, it's also possible from anywhere in the world, providing the network is secure and fast enough.

Setting up and granting access to the iOS device is the same process as when someone wants to access using a Mac. Except you need to give them a password. And make sure it is different from your primary Mac or iOS (App Store) one.

So working together or checking on your devices can be done from anywhere in the world and there are lots of ways to do that, from sharing screens and files to having complete access to a system set up far away. Setapp equips you with all the apps needed to remotely access any device you need and elevate your work to the global level.

These might also interest you:


Setapp lives on Mac and iOS. Please come back from another device.

Meantime, prepare for all the awesome things you can do with Setapp.

Read on

Sign Up

Setapp uses cookies to personalize your experience on our website. By continuing to use this site, you agree to our cookie policy.

By now, most Mac die-hards are used to getting such questions from their PC-using friends as “How can you use a mouse with just one button?” All that even though Apple makes the best trackpads in the business and you can use any mouse you want with a Mac anyway.

No matter what you think of the keyboards on Apple's laptops, their huge, luxurious, Multi-Touch, Force Touch trackpads can't be beat. And macOS includes tons of handy trackpad gestures that you might not have even tried yet: left-click, tap to click, select text, sweep every window out of the way to reveal your Desktop files, and so much more. If the native options are not enough, you can expand your toolkit with Swish, an app that has 28 intuitive gestures you can adapt to streamline the everyday workflow.

Create your own trackpad gestures

Control your Mac with a wave of your hand. In addition to keyboard shortcuts, you can also create gesture shortcuts for your trackpad and magic mouse. Try the best software right now!

Even better, with a utility like BetterTouchTool you can customize gestures on your trackpad further, as well as set up a mouse or any other input device you can connect to your Mac. If a mouse or trackpad action is taking too long, or somehow hurts your hand — for example, selecting text with a trackpad — there's probably a better, faster, easier way to do it. Here's how.

Common mouse and trackpad gestures

If you've got a Mac laptop, you should go to System Preferences and open the Trackpad pane. It's already packed with gestures you might not be using that can really speed up some tasks on your Mac.

There's no mystery to these options, either. As you mouse over or select each gesture, a video preview on the right will show exactly what will happen. It's definitely worth a few minutes to watch all the previews and decide which gestures could work for you.

Some gestures even have options you can select from a dropdown menu. For example, in the Point & Click section, you can enable the Secondary Click gesture by checking its box, and then the dropdown lets you choose if that secondary click will be a two-finger tap or click in a specific corner of the trackpad.

Here are some useful built-in gestures you might not have known about. You can enable and customize them in System Preferences ➙ Trackpad:

  • Look up & data detectors. Select a word and then Force-click (or click with three fingers) to look it up in your Mac's dictionary and thesaurus. Find it in the Point & Click tab.

  • Tap to click. Check this box to click with just a tap of your finger, instead of needing to press down hard enough to hear the sound and feel the haptic feedback.

  • Scroll direction: Natural. Uncheck this box in the Scroll & Zoom tab if you want scrolling on your trackpad to work the same as it does with a mouse: swipe up to scroll up, swipe down to scroll down. If this box is checked (and it is by default), scrolling works like it does on your iPhone and iPad: swipe up to scroll down, and swipe down to scroll up. Some people are really particular about this, and you could be one of them.

  • Rotate. When you're editing a photo that needs to be rotated, this gesture in the Scroll & Zoom tab lets you just turn the photo by rotating two fingers on the trackpad. It snaps into alignment at 90, 180, and 270 degrees, but you can stop anywhere you like.

  • Notification Center. In More Gestures, you can enable opening the Notification Center with a quick swipe of two fingers from the right edge of your trackpad, like you're pulling the Notification Center in from the side of the screen.

  • Mission Control and App Exposé. If you tend to keep too many apps or too many windows open, you need these options turned on in More Gestures. Mission Control lets you swipe up with four fingers to see every window you have open, across all apps. Swipe down with four fingers and App Exposé displays the windows you have open in the current app.

  • Look up & data detectors. This lets you select a word and then Force-click (or click with three fingers) to look it up in your Mac's dictionary and thesaurus. Find it in the Point & Click tab.

  • Tap to click. Check this box and you can click with just a tap of your finger, instead of needing to press down hard enough to hear the sound and feel the haptic feedback.

  • Scroll direction: Natural. Uncheck this box in the Scroll & Zoom tab if you want scrolling on your trackpad to work the same as it does with a mouse: Swipe up to scroll up, swipe down to scroll down. If this box is checked (and it is by default), scrolling works like it does on your iPhone and iPad: Swipe up to scroll down, and swipe down to scroll up. I uncheck this box within about 2 seconds of getting a new Mac, but it's really a personal preference.

  • Rotate: When you're editing a photo that needs to be rotated, this gesture in the Scroll & Zoom tab lets you just turn the photo by rotating two fingers on the trackpad. It snaps into alignment at 90, 180, and 270 degrees, but you can stop anywhere you like.

  • Notification Center. In More Gestures, this gesture lets you open the Notification Center with a quick swipe of two fingers from the right edge of your trackpad, like you're pulling in Notification Center from off the side of the screen.

  • Mission Control and App Exposé. If you tend to keep too many apps or just too many windows open, you need these two options in More Gestures. Mission Control lets you swipe up with four fingers to see every window you have open, across all apps. Swipe down with four fingers, and App Exposé displays the windows you have open in the current app.


More trackpad options in Accessibility

Some of the best trackpad gestures are surprisingly not included in System Preferences ➙ Trackpad at all. For example, the ability to select text by dragging three fingers over it, instead of trying to hold down the trackpad with a thumb while dragging an index finger across the text, which could cause hand cramps after a while.

This particular feature can be found in System Preferences ➙ Accessibility ➙ Mouse and Trackpad. First, you can adjust the double-click speed and specify a delay before folders spring-load when you hold a file over them. But then switch to the Trackpad Options to find the magic trick. Inside that menu is a checkbox to “Enable dragging” and a dropdown that lets you select “three-finger drag.”

It might take some practice before it's second nature. Besides selecting text by dragging with three fingers, you can also move the selected text around and even app windows the same way.

Create custom trackpad gestures to fully control your Mac

While System Preferences controls trackpad gestures that work across macOS, you can also create custom trackpad gestures to control features in the apps you use the most. All you need is BetterTouchTool.

Btt Remote For Mac

If you have a MacBook Pro with the new Touch Bar, BetterTouchTool lets you add app-specific features as Touch Bar buttons, so they are always right at your fingertips. The Touch Bar is contextual, so once you get it set up for each app you use, the buttons will change as you move from app to app.

The BetterTouchTool utility lives in your Mac's menu bar, where it can let you customize gestures for trackpad or other input devices, and even have your windows snap to specific areas of the screen too.

How to customize gestures with BetterTouchTool

To start with BetterTouchTool, click its icon in the menu bar and then go to Configuration. You’ll see all the possible input devices you can customize in a black toolbar along the top, including your trackpad, keyboard, Magic Mouse, a graphics tablet, regular mice, BTT Remote (which is a companion app for iPhones and iPads), Touch Bar, and Siri Remote. For this example, pick Trackpad.

In the pane on the left, you can choose which apps will support the new gestures. They can be Global, work just in the Finder or other specific apps (just click the plus icon to add them).

Once you've chosen all apps, click the Add New Gesture button at the bottom of the main pane. You can pick from a huge number of one, two, three, four, and even five-finger gestures, or your gesture can be a custom tapping pattern or even use some Force Touch functionality. Here, you can specify a modifier key that needs to be pressed at the same time as well, but it’s a good practice to avoid using the keyboard when setting up trackpad gestures.

When you’re done with the gesture, you should tell BetterTouchTool what this gesture should actually do. If the action has a keyboard shortcut, for example, you can enter that in the Custom Keyboard Shortcut field.

If the action doesn't have a keyboard shortcut yet, you can always create a new keyboard shortcut for it in System Preferences ➙ Keyboard ➙ Shortcuts. Go there first to set up a keyboard shortcut for any menu item in any given application and then head back to BetterTouchTool to set up a gesture that can stand in for that keyboard shortcut.

BetterTouchTool's Predefined Action menu also includes actions that you might not find in standard menus for other apps, such as closing or resizing windows, starting the screen saver, or summoning Siri.

How to use a custom drawing as a gesture

If you’re wondering how far trackpad gestures can go, just imagine that you can draw anything and turn it into an action. Let’s see how.

In the Drawings tab of BetterTouchTool Preferences, you can use your trackpad to draw a line that you can then assign to an action, which will make the drawing into a trackpad gesture.

When creating a drawing, BetterTouchTool will ask you to repeat it several times, so the software can recognize its variations too. Then just click Finish and Save before assigning that drawing to a keyboard shortcut or action. Drawings, in general, open tons of possibilities for custom gestures beyond taps and swipes.

How to trigger multiple actions with one gesture

Once you've gotten the hang of setting up gestures to perform one action, it's time to level up! BetterTouchTool can let you assign multiple actions to one gesture, which lets you shorten multi-step workflows you repeat every day.

For example, if you want a gesture to open your web mail client in Safari from anywhere on your Mac, here's what you'd do:

  1. In the sidebar on the left, select Global

  2. At the bottom of the main pane, click Add New Gesture

  3. Select a gesture. In this example, it’s Tip Tap Left. A little animation of it appears next to the Add New Gesture button, so you can see how it works. This gesture consists of putting one finger down and tapping with the second.

  4. In the Predefined Action dropdown, select Launch Application, which asks you to specify which application to launch. Choose Safari.

  5. Now click the Attach Additional Action button. This lets you put in another action (predefined or a keyboard shortcut) that will run sequentially after the first one. Enter ⌘ + T in the Custom Keyboard Shortcut field to have Safari launch a new tab.

  6. Include as many more actions as you need. For this one, that's just a Predefined Action called Open URL, which asks for the URL to open the first time you set it up.

Control your Mac using BTT Remote for iOS

If you get the companion BetterTouchTool (BTT) Remote app for your iPhone or iPad, you can simply use your mobile device to execute BetterTouchTool gestures on your Mac, as long as they are both on the same WiFi network. These gestures should be set up in BetterTouchTool Preferences under the BTT Remote tab.

BTT Remote also lets you access your Mac's file browser and menu bar from your iPhone or iPad — plus, it can turn your device's screen into a trackpad. This effectively lets you control your Mac from across the room, which can come in extremely handy.

Remote-controlling with your smartphone is especially great if you use your Mac as a substitute for TV. For example, you could set up a BetterTouchTool gesture for BTT Remote to launch Safari and open Netflix in a new tab. Then just switch to the trackpad and pick a movie.

Another gesture could open your favorite locally stored video file in Elmedia Player, take the app fullscreen, and turn up the volume. Now your favorite movie is only one tap away. Any other adjustments with media keys can also be easily done with BTT Remote.

Arrange app windows in one click

Another useful feature in BetterTouchTool is how it can snap your app windows into their preferred spots on the screen.

In the BetterTouchTool Preferences, click the Settings gear to enter the Basic Settings and check the box to Enable Window Snapping. Now when you drag a window's title bar to a corner of your screen, a window outline will appear showing which corner or side of the screen the window will snap into. To maximize a window, drag it to the top edge of the screen.

If you find these controls pretty basic, you can go into Advanced Settings ➙ Window Snapping to tweak more granular controls that will make the feature work exactly the way you want. Say, if you only want half and fullscreen apps, no quarter-screen apps, you can set that up. If you want the half-screen apps to take up 70% and 30% of the screen respectively, rather than 50–50%, that's doable too. You can even leave a little empty space between windows as padding.

In fact, if you click the BetterTouchTool menu bar icon, you'll find an option called Snap Areas (Advanced Feature) that lets you create new snap areas using the current window as a template. This should help tremendously in keeping your Mac’s desktop organized so you don’t have to take the time to manually arrange your windows every single day.

Get automated gestures out of the box

Btt Remote For Mac

If customizing every gesture feels like too much work, you can get a tool that does it all for you. Swish is a newbie-friendly alternative to BetterTouchTool. It comes with 28 intuitive gestures that will speed up your workflow, organized by the type of task. No custom actions here, you can quickly adapt available gestures and start using them.

It’s super easy to get going with Swish since you don’t really have to adjust any settings. Simply open the app, check available gestures in Preferences — you’ll find instructions on how to control apps, windows, manage snapping, etc. — and get back to work.

Another huge perk of Swish is that it’s built natively for macOS and therefore feels like its integral part — at the first touch. The app works with the Magic Mouse and uses the macOS internal logic, which makes things smooth and easy.

Take full control of your trackpad

Once you get going with BetterTouchTool and Swish, you'll wonder how you ever lived without gesture control before — the trackpad is so incredibly powerful with the right tools at your fingertips. And when you get BTT Remote involved to fully control your Mac from your iPhone or iPad, the sky's the limit.

Best of all, you can try both BetterTouchTool and Swish for free during a 7-day trial with Setapp, a subscription platform with more than 190 best-in-class Mac apps to supercharge your productivity. Time to challenge yourself to come up with a few time-saving shortcuts today!

Setapp lives on Mac and iOS. Please come back from another device.

Meantime, prepare for all the awesome things you can do with Setapp.

Read on

Sign Up

Setapp uses cookies to personalize your experience on our website. By continuing to use this site, you agree to our cookie policy.